Combined Infrared and Ultraviolet Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

International Mass Spectrometry Conference, Florence, Italy, August 27, 2018

IMSC 2018 : Combined Infrared and Ultraviolet Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry
IMSC 2018 : Combined Infrared and Ultraviolet Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

Kermit K. Murray, Remi O. Lawal, and Fabrizio Donnarumma
Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

Introduction

We are using combined mid-infrared and deep-ultraviolet two-laser ablation coupled with electrospray ionization for ambient mass spectrometry of biomolecules in tissue. The goal is to increase nanoparticle production and improve sensitivity by using the UV laser to disrupt the tissue structure followed by IR ablation and ionization.

Methods

In this work, we are using a 193 nm ArF excimer laser to disrupt the tissue prior to irradiating with a 3000 nm IR optical parametric oscillator. Both lasers are focused onto the same target spot and separated in time by an adjustable delay. A nanospray needle is directed at the inlet on-axis of a modified quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

Results

The two-laser ablation system has been constructed and initial studies carried out for optimization of the system with peptide and protein standards. The lasers are mounted on an aluminum breadboard adjacent to the ion source and are focused onto the target with a single calcium fluoride lens for each beam. The dual-laser configuration can be operated either with the UV firing first to disrupt the covalent bonding in the tissue or with the IR firing first to heat the tissue. Initial studies with 193 nm laser ablation electrospray ionization demonstrate that the deep-UV is a much softer ionization method than might be anticipated and can produce ions from peptides and proteins without a matrix and with little fragmentation. Based on this interesting new result, initial experiments are aimed at improving the efficiency of the deep-UV ablation using IR laser pre-heating.

Conclusions

We have demonstrated that deep-UV and IR ablation coupled with electrospray ionization is a promising soft ionization method for large molecules with applications to tissue imaging. Continuing experiments are aimed at optimizing the UV and IR laser pulse energies and time delay to improve the sensitivity as well as improving the UV laser focus to improve spatial resolution.

Novel Aspect: Combined mid-infrared and deep-ultraviolet laser ablation on the same spot for laser ablation electrospray ionization imaging.

Infrared laser ablation sampling coupled with data independent high resolution UPLC-IM-MS/MS for tissue analysis

Infrared laser ablation sampling coupled with data independent high resolution UPLC-IM-MS/MS for tissue analysis
M. E. Pettit, F. Donnarumma, K. K. Murray, & T. Solouki, Analytica Chimica Acta in Press, DOI: 10.1016/j.aca.2018.06.066

Infrared laser ablation sampling coupled with data independent high resolution UPLC-IM-MS/MS for tissue analysis DOI: 10.1016/j.aca.2018.06.066
Infrared laser ablation sampling coupled with data independent high resolution UPLC-IM-MS/MS for tissue analysis

Infrared laser ablation microsampling was used with data-dependent acquisition (DDA) and ion mobility-enhanced data-independent acquisition (HDMSE) for mass spectrometry based bottom-up proteomics analysis of rat brain tissue. Results from HDMSE and DDA analyses of the 12 laser ablation sampled tissue sections showed that HDMSE consistently identified approximately seven times more peptides and four times more proteins than DDA. To evaluate the impact of ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) peak congestion on HDMSE and DDA analysis, whole tissue digests from rat brain were analyzed at six different UPLC separation times. Analogous to results from laser ablated samples, HDMSE analyses of whole tissue digests yielded about four times more proteins identified than DDA for all six UPLC separation times.

Infrared laser ablation and capture of enzymes with conserved activity

Wang, K., Donnarumma, F., Baldone, M. D., & Murray, K. K. Infrared laser ablation and capture of enzymes with conserved activity. Anal Chim Acta, 1027, 41–46 (2018).

Graphical abstract: Infrared laser ablation and capture of enzymes with conserved activity
Graphical abstract: Infrared laser ablation and capture of enzymes with conserved activity

Abstract

Infrared (IR) laser ablation at 3 μm wavelength was used to extract enzymes from tissue and quantitatively determine their activity. Experiments were conducted with trypsin, which was ablated, captured and then used to digest bovine serum albumin (BSA). BSA digests were evaluated using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) and sequence coverage of 59% was achieved. Quantification was performed using trypsin and catalase standards and rat brain tissue by fluorescence spectroscopy. Both enzymes were reproducibly transferred with an efficiency of 75 ± 8% at laser fluences between 10 and 30 kJ/m2. Trypsin retained 37 ± 2% of its activity and catalase retained 50 ± 7%. The activity of catalase from tissue was tested using three consecutive 50 μm thick rat brain sections. Two 4 mm2 regions were ablated and captured from the cortex and cerebellum regions. The absolute catalase concentration in the two regions was consistent with previously published data, demonstrating transfer of intact enzymes from tissue.